setting goals when planning your conference event in Manchester and Cheshire

Event Management in Manchester: Burglars and the Art of Goal Setting

“I really hope that this conference/incentive/awards dinner I’m organising comes across as mediocre and that people aren’t too bored” said no-one, ever.

It goes without saying, that whatever the event you want to organise, you will want it to go well (whatever that means to you). That’s a given.

The challenge is working out the “whatever that means to you” bit.

What we’re talking about here is setting objectives, identifying goals, and looking for outcomes from events. And ideally, with some sort of measurement, to be able to establish whether a goal has actually been met. Now I appreciate that this last part is not always possible, certainly immediately after the event, but perhaps it could be measured with the passage of time.

Too many times we have come across briefs or even been to events, where the objective of spending significant amounts of money almost seems to have been brushed over, or at least the focus has been lost. We recently went to an evening showcase at a new Manchester hotel. We wanted to see all the spaces and particularly its unique event space – a feature we knew our clients would love.

There were hundreds of people in a huge bar area, slurping free drinks and we were struggling to even find hosts to give us a show around. We couldn’t even get to see the unique space…because it was booked for a private function.

Really?

Hundreds of potential customers are on your doorstep to see your new space and you’ve taken a booking.

No clarified objective had been established. Or at least commitment to achieving the objective had not been managed or enforced.   Too much focus had been given to getting feet through the door rather than what to do with them once they were there.

Setting objectives is difficult – much, much harder than not setting them. But the rewards are self-evident and this is true in any aspect of life whether it’s a health programme you want to follow, your career, or running an event.

A few nights ago I saw Anthony Crolla on the news. He’s a boxer from Manchester. He was due to challenge for the WBA World Lightweight title in January this year. Unfortunately he spent last Christmas on the sofa with a fractured skull and broken ankle after burglars hit him with a paving slab. That could seriously damage your plans to become a World champion.

But Anthony used his experience with the burglars to channel his focus even more intensely on his goal. He recovered and had a crack at the title in July this year and was controversially beaten by spurious judging. He was immediately granted a rematch this November. I wonder how he’ll be feeling this Christmas, if he wins.

You don’t have to be a boxing fan to admire this man’s focus on goal setting and his commitment to achieving them. (The burglars, by the way were caught immediately – no team points for their goal setting.)

Goal setting is a habit forming. Try setting a goal today - something achievable. It can feel quite uplifting when you nail it. Then do another one tomorrow, and so on. After a while you’ll naturally be thinking of more challenging goals and objectives with timeframes further out.

If you’re organising an event, apply the same approach. Don’t allow burglars (or other problems) to distract you. Identify your objectives and be committed to achieving them.

You can read more about setting event objectives in our free 9-step guide “So you want to run an event?” available as a download from a number of pages on this website.

(And fingers crossed for Anthony.)